Friday, October 31, 2014

Sharing Our 100 Word Challenge Stories


100 Word Challenge: Finishing Touches  Happy Friday and Happy Halloween! Before we publish our 100 Word Challenge stories, take one last moment to carefully review your writing. At the very least, make sure your spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are as good as they can be. And don't forget my mom's little piece of advice:








Also, don't forget to highlight each of the five required words in your story:  broken   green  cat  swimming  lifted.

100 Word Challenge: Publishing Time  The moment has arrived: It's publishing time! Copy your story from your Google Doc and then login to Kidblog. Make a new post. This week you once again get to title your story whatever you find fitting; just make sure you put 100WC: before your chosen title. Paste your story. Finally, click "Publish".  

Next, copy the web address of your posted story and then head over to 100 Word Challenge. Scroll down and paste the web address into the box that says 'Blog Link'. Enter your first name, 6th Grade, Lakeview Middle School, and for location: Watsonville, California, U.S.A. Finally, click 'Submit'. Congratulations! You have published yet another story. I can't wait to hear about the feedback you receive.  

Reading Our Stories Aloud  Our writing can really take flight when we read aloud. Today you will have the opportunity to read your newly crafted stories aloud to your classmates. As you read today, consider your volume, phrasing, and expression. Make sure you read loud enough for each of your classmates to hear you. Try to read word your words clearly and smoothly. Finally, don't read robotically; put a little emotion and humanity into your delivery. We will use ClassDojo to randomly select the order of our readers. I'm looking forward to hearing your stories!  

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading LogI will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, November 3

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Celebrating a Championship and Constructing Responses

World Champions yet again. 
Video of the Day  Relive the magical moment the San Francisco Giants clinched their third World Series championship in the past five years here 

Writing Performance Tasks: The Constructed Responses  Today we are going to continue familiarizing ourselves with the upcoming Writing Performance Tasks. Our specific focus today will be on constructing a response to 'Research Question' # 3, which can be found below. 


Unlike yesterday's constructed responses, this question requires us to develop a claim (or argument) and support that claim with evidence. So, what do you think? Do you agree with the statement that Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park "now holds little importance as it is just a tourist attraction"? Or do you disagree with the statement and believe that the park remains a very important place and has value beyond its designation as a tourist attraction? 

The position you take will affect the type of evidence you gather. Let's work together to gather details form the various sources that would support our particular claims. Review the three sources here and identify details and evidence that support your point of view. Share your details on one of two Padlet walls. If you disagree with the statement that Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park "holds little importance as it is just a tourist attraction," share details that would support your claim here. If you agree with that statement, share your supporting details here

Next, we want to begin to construct a response in which we clearly state our claim (or argument) and provide evidence from the various sources to support it. Here's what the District is looking for.  



You can find still the document Writing Performance Tasks - Research Questions and Constructed Responses in your Language Arts folders. Please begin working on Constructed Response #3 now. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a Digital Reading Log entry.  (2.) Tomorrow, Friday, October 31, is publishing day. Make sure your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story is ready to share with the world! I would also like to dedicate some time in class tomorrow to reading our stories aloud. Please practice reading yours and be prepared to share!  

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Writing Performance Tasks: Research Questions and Constructed Responses

Don't stop believing! A World Series Champion will be crowned tonight.

Writing Performance Tasks: The Research Questions  Let's begin today by locating the highlighted/modified version of the the document Sample Writing Performance Tasks (6th Grade) in our Google Drives form yesterday. 

Next, let's revisit the Research Questions listed after the three sources/articles. Today we are specifically going to focus on Questions 1 and 2. Question 1 can be found below. 


What vocabulary words must we understand to be successful in our response? Any words you see that could pose potential challenges to understanding? Finally, what exactly is the question asking us to do? Discuss with your partner and be prepared to share your ideas with the whole class. 

Now let's take a close look at Question 2 below. 









Do you see any challenging vocabulary? What are we being asked to do this time? Discuss. 

Writing Performance Tasks: The Constructed Responses  Now that we better understand what the 'Research Questions' are asking, it's time to understand what is expected from us in our written responses (also known as constructed responses). 

The District makes it pretty clear what they expect because they released scoring rubrics for both responses. Take a look. 

As you look at the three levels of proficiency, what differences do you notice? What questions do you have? For example, what's the different between "sufficient evidence" compared to "limited evidence"? Let's discuss and work through it as a class. 

Additional questions I have on your behalf, include, what exactly does the "ability to gather, analyze, and integrate information" mean? The District seeks to clarify by providing the information below.
Is it more clear now exactly what our task is? What questions remain? 

If time permits, let's start our constructed responses today. You can find the document Writing Performance Tasks - Research Questions and Constructed Responses in your Language Arts folders. We will continue working on this tomorrow. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a Digital Reading Log entry.  (2.) Continue working on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story. We will be publishing our stories on Friday, October 31

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Sampling the Writing Performance Tasks


Warm-Up: Silent Reading  Let's ease into this beautiful Tuesday with a little silent reading. Please take out your A.R. book and begin. If you need to take an A.R. quiz, please do so. 

Writing Performance Tasks: Overview  As our school, our district, and our country move forward with the new Common Core standards, we are going to be increasingly asked to rethink the way we learn and show what we know in new and sometimes challenging ways. 

Today we will begin examining sample 'Writing Performance Tasks,' in which we will be tasked with reading three informative sources/articles, answering questions about the sources, and ultimately planning and writing an informational essay based on the reading. 

This is practice and let's treat this exercise as a learning experience. There is no need to feel stressed out or anxious. Let's work through this process together with open minds and use it an opportunity to prepare us for the upcoming "real" and "official" Writing Performance Tasks. 

Writing Performance Tasks: Getting Started  In your Language Arts folders, each of you should find a PDF copy of the document Sample Writing Performance Tasks (6th Grade). After opening our PDF, we are going to convert it to writable and editable form using DocHub. This form will allow us to highlight and write on the document.   

Next, let's carefully read the directions and preview the task together. What do you notice? What questions do you have?  

Writing Performance Tasks: Examining the Sources  After previewing the task, what information should we be looking for? As we read together feel free to highlight key details and information from the sources/articles that you feel will ultimately help you with the tasks to follow. You can also take notes on the document itself.  

Writing Performance Tasks: The Research Questions  After reading the sources/articles, let's begin to carefully review the three research questions. In the future, your answers to these questions will be scored. Also, they will help you think about the sources/articles you've read, which should help you write your informational essay. We will dedicate our class time tomorrow to working through these research questions. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a Digital Reading Log entry.  (2.) Continue working on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story. We will be publishing our stories on Friday, October 31 

Monday, October 27, 2014

Library Visit and a New 100 Word Challenge


Library Visit  Happy Monday! Let' get the week started with a visit to the library. You may return or renew books, check out new ones, silently read, or take A.R. tests. When checking out books, make sure you are selecting titles that are engaging and within your ZPD. If you're unsure about your reading level or ZPD, just ask. Please use your library time wisely! 

This Week's 100 Word Challenge:   Broken   Green   Swimming   Cat   Lifted  This week's challenge is another unique one. It doesn't involve a picture or a designated phrase, but it's rather made up of a random assortment of five words. Read more about the challenge below. 
You can find the assignment 100 Word Challenge: Five Words in your Language Arts folders. How will you strategically weave this 5 words throughout your story, while still constructing a logical narrative? What will these specially chosen words add to your story? Remember the words can be used in whatever order you see fit. Also, remember as you write to continue developing your imagery by using precise words, sensory details, and literary devices such as similes. We publish on Friday. Have fun!    

Meet the Language Arts 'A-Team'  Earning an 'A' in Language Arts is no easy task. But the students featured below are of to an Awesome start to the new quarter and currently hold A's in this challenging and rigorous course. You will notice some familiar faces, but others are delightful surprises. Keeping their A's will certainly require lots of dedication and hard work. Nevertheless, right now I'm so proud of them and to each I say, Bravo!   

Language Arts - Period 2
Language Arts - Period 3
Language Arts - Period 5


















Homework (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a Digital Reading Log entry.  (2.) Get started on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story. We will be publishing our stories on Friday, October 31

Friday, October 24, 2014

Aloha Friday!


Finish Benchmark Test  Aloha Friday! And congratulations on nearly finishing your first full week of the 2nd Quarter. If you need to finish the Benchmark test that we started yesterday, please refer to yesterday's Blog entry about how to login. If you already finished, you may use this time to either finish your 100 Word Challenge stories, silent read, or take A.R. quizzes.  

100 Word Challenge: Finishing Touches  Before we publish, take one last moment to carefully review your writing. At the very least, make sure your spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are as good as they can be. My mom, Irene McGinty, who was also used to be a classroom teacher, also has this piece of advice:
100 Word Challenge: Publishing Time  The moment has arrived: It's publishing time! Copy your story from your Google Doc and then login to Kidblog. Make a new post. This week you get to title your story whatever you find fitting; just make sure you put 100WC: before your chosen title. Paste your story. You may also want to include the mysterious image that inspired your story with your post. Finally, click "Publish".  

Next, copy the web address of your posted story and then head over to 100 Word Challenge. Scroll down and paste the web address into the box that says 'Blog Link'. Enter your first name, 6th Grade, Lakeview Middle School, and for location: Watsonville, California, U.S.A. Finally, click 'Submit'. Congratulations! You have published yet another story. I can't wait to hear about the feedback you receive.  


Commenting on Blog Posts  If time permits, I'm going to encourage you to comment on at least one blog post by another student. Remember your comments should be respectful, specific, and helpful. 

On your Kidblog class blog, under the section 'Blogroll' you can find links to other classes you may consider visiting, including several from other parts of the country and world. When commenting on a blog post outside of Lakeview, make sure you identify who you are (first names only) and where you come from: Watsonville, California, U.S.A.  Make sure you represent yourself, our class, our school, and our country in a respectful and professional manner. Have fun!  

Library Visit on Monday  We will be visiting the library first thing on Monday in order to get new A.R. books. Make sure you bring any books you need to return or renew and your student ID card with you. Make sure you are also familiar with your ZPD and the color books you should be reading. If you're not sure, just ask.   

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading LogI will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, October 27

Thursday, October 23, 2014

The District Benchmark Test


The District Benchmark Test  Today we are taking the District Benchmark Test, which is what we call a 'formative assessment' intended to monitor student learning. The test will hep you identify your strengths and weaknesses and target areas that need work. The test will also help me recognize where students are struggling so I can better know what I need to address.  

Please try your best on today's test. It's important and provides both you and I with valuable information. We will try to finish the test today in one sitting. However, if you don't finish in one class period there is an option to 'pause' the test when you logout, and I will prove you with time to finish later. 

Step 1: Go to pvusd.net. Click on Students, then scroll down to Illuminate Home Portal

Step 2: Select the Student tab on the Illuminate Connection screen. 

Step 3: Login using your student ID# as your Username and your birthdate as your Password. (For example a birthdate of January 7, 2000 is entered as Ja072000)

Step 4: Select Assessments from the list located under "What You Would Like to See". 

Step 5: Click on the link under "Pending Online Assessment" to begin work.

Final Note: Please be aware that there may be a difference on the test between multiple choice items (only one correct response) and selected response items (one or more than one correct response). Be on the lookout for key words in questions such as "select all that apply".

If you finish the exam early, you may take out an A.R. book and read. Good luck!  

Homework (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry.  (2.) Complete the Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme and Nadia the Willful - Understanding Theme assignments. Both are due: tomorrow, Friday, October October 24.  (3.) Your 100 Word Challenge: Picture Challenge story needs to be completed by tomorrow, Friday, October October 24 because tomorrow is publishing day!     
     

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Identifying and Understanding Theme in "Nadia the Willful"

What lesson does Tarik learn in "Nadia the Willful"? Could this be a clue to the theme of the story?

 Today's Learning Objective   Identify and Understand the theme of a story

Identifying and Understanding Theme in "Nadia the Willful"  Today will finish reading the short story "Nadia the Willful" (starting on pg. 72 of our Language of Literature textbooks) and the work together to identify possible themes. You can still find the assignment Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme in your Language Arts folders. 

Additionally, we will closely examine two suggested themes of the story, which can essentially be considered two different claims. We will select the the claim that best fits our understanding of the story's theme and provide evidence from the story to support our ideas. You can find the assignment Nadia the Willful - Understanding Theme in your Language Arts folders. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry using your new Reading Log for Quarter 2.  (2.) Complete the Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme and Nadia the Willful - Understanding Theme assignments. Both are dueFriday, October October 24  

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Identifying Theme in "Nadia the Willful"

"Nadia the Willful" Background: The Bedouins, the group featured in today's story, are an Arab people of the Sahara and the desert lands of the Middle East. The leader of a Bedouin tribe or clan is called a sheik. Bedouins live as nomads, or wanderers, searching the desert for oases (placed with water and pasture) where they can settle with their goats, sheep, camels, and horses. When water becomes scare, the group moves on. Life in the desert is hard and dangerous. Food is scarce, sandstorms are common, and temperatures can reach up to 130 degrees Fahrenheit. 

 Today's Learning Objective   Identify the theme of a story

Warm Up  Happy Tuesday! Yesterday you were asked to analyze a favorite movie or book and try to identify its theme. Now go to Padlet (2nd Period, 3rd Period, 5th Period) and share the title and theme of your book or movie on our digital classroom wall.  

Identifying Theme in "Nadia the Willful"  Today will be reading a wonderful piece of short fiction entitled "Nadia the Willful" and try to identify its theme. Open your Language of Literature textbooks to page 67. First, examine the "Build Background" section and the images. Take note of the setting of this story. Read the "Focus Your Reading" section to remind yourself what theme is in a story and how to determine it. 

As we read "Nadia the Willful" together, we will pay special attention to the characters and their actions, speech, thoughts, and how they change, as clues to determining the story's theme. You can find the assignment Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme in your Language Arts folders. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. A new Reading Log for Quarter 2 has been placed in your Language Arts folders. Please use it this quarter. (2.) Continue work on you 100 Word Challenge: Picture Challenge story. (3.) Complete the Nadia the Willful - Characters and Theme  assignment. DueFriday, October October 24 

Monday, October 20, 2014

Introducing Theme and a New 100 Word Challenge

What is Theme?
Introduction to Theme in Literature  Theme is the meaning or moral of a story. It is a message about life or human nature that the writer shares with the reader. Most themes are unstated. You must figure them out by paying attention to what happens in a story. You can gather clues to the theme of a piece of literature by looking at the characters, the plot, the setting, and the story title

For more on what the "theme of a story" is and how to identify it, watch the short video below. 


Next, for practice, analyze a favorite movie or novel and then try to determine its theme. The assignment Identifying Theme can be found in your Language Arts folders. 

This Week's 100 Word Challenge  There's a bit of a twist to this week's 100 Word Challenge. You are not required to write a story inspired by a set of words but rather by an image. You can find advice from the folks at 100 Word Challenge and the image below.  
What story will this mysterious image inspire you to write?
Where will your story take place? What happens there? Who is the mysterious figure? I can't wait to see what you come up with. You can find the assignment 100 Word Challenge: Picture Challenge in your Language Arts folders. Continue to use descriptive language, imagery, and other literary devices in your writing. Bring the image above to life in the minds of your readers. Good luck!  


Miguel, Showcase Writer
Showcase Writer: Miguel  Many of you continue to get wonderful feedback on your writing from readers all over the world. One student in particular just received a very special recognition for his "Suddenly I was able to see" story. Our very own Miguel, from Period 2, was singled out for his heartwarming story about a blind boy who dreams of seeing as part of the Week 6 Showcase. His name and story have been published internationally and he will receive a special showcase badge and certificate for his achievement. If you see Miguel, give him props for this special honor!  His original story and new showcase badge are featured below. 




Homework (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. A new Reading Log for Quarter 2 has been placed in your Language Arts folders. Please use it this quarter. (2.) Get started on your 100 Word Challenge: Picture Challenge story. (3.) Complete the Identifying Theme assignment. Due: Friday, October October 24

Friday, October 17, 2014

Publishing Our Writing and Heading to the World Series

Ishikawa's 9th inning home run sends the Giants to the World Series.

Video of the Day  Happy Friday, Giants fans! Relive last night's heroic moment that propelled the Giants into World Series.


100 Word Challenge: Finishing Touches  Before we publish, take one last moment to carefully review your writing. At the very least, make sure your spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are as good as they can be. The folks at 100 Word Challenge share their simple advice below about what to do before posting.   
100 Word Challenge: Publishing Time  The moment has arrived: It's publishing time! Copy your story from your Google Doc and then login to Kidblog. Make a new post entitled "100 WC: I could not believe the smell" and paste your story into the text box below. Finally, click "Publish".  

Next, copy the web address of your posted story and then head over to 100 Word Challenge. Scroll down and paste the web address into the box that says 'Blog Link'. Enter your first name, 6th Grade, Lakeview Middle School, and for location: Watsonville, California, U.S.A. Finally, click 'Submit'. Congratulations! You have published another story. I can't wait to hear about the feedback you receive.  

Commenting on Blog Posts  Today I'm going to encourage you to comment on at least one blog post by another student. Remember your comments should be respectful, specific, and helpful. If you liked something about someone's writing, explain what specific aspect of their writing you appreciated. For example: I loved your use of descriptive details! If you have a tip about how a student could improve their writing, make sure to share in a way that is helpful and not hurtful. For example: I really liked your story, but I thought you could have used a few more sensory details. For more suggestions on how to be a great blog post commenter check out the video below.  


On your Kidblog class blog, under the section 'Blogroll' you can find links to other classes you may consider visiting, including a few from other parts of the country and world. When commenting on a blog post outside of Lakeview, make sure you identify who you are (first names only) and where you come from: Watsonville, California, U.S.A.  Make sure you represent yourself, our class, our school, and our country in a respectful and professional manner. Have fun!  

Homework  Make sure you read for 30 minutes at least once over the weekend and make an entry on your Digital Reading LogI will be grading this week's Reading Log on Monday, October 20

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Making Writing Exciting


Warm Up: Silent Reading and A.R. Testing  Congratulations on reaching the end of your first quarter of middle school! If you still have any A.R. quizzes that you still need to take, now is the time to do it. If not, you may you use this time to silent read, check grades, or communicate with teachers. 

Making Writing Exciting: Interactive Scary Story Activity  Today you will be acting as assistants to a book publisher and working to make one of their dull stories more exciting. The story "The Abandoned House" is not as scary or exciting as the publishers were hoping for. Your task is to substitute some of the story's nouns and verbs to make the story more vivid and engaging. You can find the activity here 

Practice Into Action: Creative Writing Time  You will now have time to work on your own stories (100 Word Challenge: I could not believe the smell). How will you apply what you've learned? What are you going to do to make your writing more exciting, vivid, and engaging? If Gary Paulsen or Francisco Jiménez were writing a scene in your story, what sorts of details, words, or literacy devices might they use? I can't wait to see what you come up with this week. 

Homework (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Complete your 100 Word Challenge: I could not believe the smell story. DueTomorrow, Friday, October 17. (3.) Complete the assignment Imagery - Woodsong, which is also due tomorrow, Friday, October 17

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Imagery in Gary Paulsen's Woodsong (Day 2)


 Today's Learning Objective    Recognize imagery and its effects

Taking Care of Business Time: Silent Reading, A.R. Testing, Grade Checking, Communicating with Teachers  Friendly reminder: Tomorrow is the last day of your 1st quarter of middle school! It's the last the day to turn in missing or incomplete assignments. It's the last day to take A.R. tests and earn points towards your reading goal. It's the last day to do whatever needs to be done to get your grades up.

You may use the beginning of class today to silent read and take A.R. tests. You may also use this time to review your grades and assignments on School Loop and figure how to dedicate your energy during these last moments of the 1st quarter. Additionally, consider messaging teachers if you have questions or need to inform them of anything related to your assignments or grades.  

Guided Reading: Woodsong  Today we will continue reading from an excerpt of Woodsong by Gary Pauslen. You can find the reading selection on pages 165-169 of your Language of Literature textbook. 

We will continue to use the document Imagery - Woodsong (in your Language Arts folders) to record the examples of descriptions in Woodsong that appeal to the senses. This assignment will be due on Friday, October 17

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Tomorrow is the last day of the 1st quarter and several assignments are due tomorrow, Thursday, October 16, including: The Circuit - Literary Devices and The Circuit - Visualizing. (3.) Complete the assignment Imagery - Woodsong, which is due on Friday, October 17

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Imagery in Gary Paulsen's Woodsong




 Today's Learning Objective    Recognize imagery and its effects

Warm Up: 'The Circuit' Quiz  Today you will take a short quiz to demonstrate some of what you learned from the story "The Circuit". You can find the quiz here. If you complete the quiz early, you may silent read or take A.R. tests until the rest of your classmates are finished.   

Build Background: Woodsong  Today we begin reading from Woodsong, a memoir by Gary Paulsen. Remember that a memoir is an example of nonfiction similar to an autobiography because it's a self-told life story, but it tends to be shorter and more focused on certain events. A memoir is essentially a writer's description of his or her own memories.

Gary Paulsen is one of America's most popular writers for young people. Although he was never a dedicated student, Paulsen developed a passion for reading at an early age. After a librarian gave him a book to read — along with his own library card — he was hooked. He began spending hours alone in the basement of his apartment building, reading one book after another. As a writer, he is best known for coming of age stories about the wilderness. Watch the brief video below in which Pauslen discusses his early life and the craft of writing.


Paulsen often writes about his own life in the wilderness of Minnesota, as he does in Woodsong. Wild animals, such as bears, were a part of Gary Paulsen's everyday life. Study the 'Build Background' text and map below to understand more about the place that serves as the setting in Woodsong


Guided Reading: Woodsong  Now we will begin reading from an excerpt of Woodsong by Gary Pauslen. You can find the reading selection on pages 165-169 of your Language of Literature textbook. 

As we read our job is to pay special attention to Paulsen's use of imagery. Remember that words that appeal to the the reader's five senses are called imagery. Imagery helps readers visualize and imagine how a person, place, or object, looks, feels, sounds, tastes, or smells. Gary Paulsen uses a variety of descriptions to help his words come to life. 

You will use document Imagery - Woodsong (in your Language Arts folders) to record the examples of descriptions in Woodsong that appeal to the senses. This assignment will be due on Friday, October 17

Homework (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (2.) Take A.R. tests and work towards achieving your Accelerated Reader goal. Your reading grade depends on it!  (3.) Make up any assignments that are missing or incomplete. 1st quarter ends this Thursday, October 16. 

Monday, October 13, 2014

Writing With Our Noses

What role will your nose play in this week's 100 Word Challenge? 
Library Visit  Happy Monday! We discovered on Friday that some of you were never issued Language of Literature textbooks at the beginning of the school year. We will pay a brief visit to the library today so that those of you that need a copy receive one. Now you can all complete your assignments related to "The Circuit" at home. 

This Week's 100 Word Challenge: Can You Smell It?  Congratulations on completing your first 100 Word Challenge last week! I was so impressed with the quality of your writing, especially your use of descriptive details and imagery. Many of you have already received feedback from readers from around the world. How exciting!

This week's challenge is another intriguing one. The prompt is: . . . I could not believe the smell . . .  

There are endless possibilities here. I can't wait to see what you come up with. You can find the document 100 Word Challenge: I could not believe the smell in your Language Arts folders.

Since 'smell' is such an important part of this week's challenge, I am providing you with some lists of specific sensory words that appeal to your readers' sense of smell. 




Describing the way something smells is no easy task. Check out the way some published authors have described the way things smell below.  




Looking for additional resources on capturing smells in writing? You can find a list of "pleasant" smell words here and a list of "unpleasant" smell words here. Additionally, you can find a how-to-guide on describing smells here. Finally, keep in mind that even though the sense of "smell" is a special focus of this week's challenge, the imagery in your writing should still try to appeal to your readers' other senses as well. 

A Student Example  My eight year old son Owen was very excited about this week's prompt and decided to write his own story as part of the 100 Word Challenge. Here is what he came up, with just a little help from his dad. The link to his story is here. I know Owen would love your feedback.   



Telling a Scary Story?  There are so many places you could go with this week's prompt. Perhaps there is a very scary story lurking behind that smell. If you're interested in incorporating "I could not believe the smell" into a scary story, you may consider using some of the words from the 'scary word' list here

The short video below is also helpful in explaining some of the things you may want to consider when conceiving a scary story. 




Homework  (1.) Start writing your 100 Word Challenge: I could not believe the smell story. (2.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and make a digital Reading Log entry. (3.) Scholastic Book Orders are due tomorrow!